Archive for November, 2016

Radiatori Angstromi

Monday, November 21st, 2016

(Radiator Pasta in Angstrom Sauce)

One of the first things I learned when I worked at Lidia’s was that pasta sauce can encompass a whole range of possibilities beyond tomato, alfredo, or cheese.  So long as there’s some liquid component to tie everything together, pasta can serve as a vehicle for all kinds of flavors.

This recipe was a huge hit with the whole family, especially Angstrom.  It was when he ladled his third helping onto his plate that I realized it was a real winner and probably deserved to be written down.  Because his enthusiasm prompted me to write it down, I’ve named it in his honor.

Ingredients

  • 1 large onion
  • about 2 cups finely chopped mushrooms (I used a mix of maitake and crimini)
  • 1 leftover baked sweet potato
  • about 2 cups leftover pot roast, with its liquid
  • 1/4 leftover roasted cabbage
  • chicken stock as needed to adjust consistency
  • Salt and pepper
  • butter

Instructions

  1. Make a pot roast dinner, with baked sweet potatoes and roasted cabbage as the side dishes.  Save the leftovers at the end of the meal
  2. Dice an onion and cook it in butter in a #10 cast iron skillet with salt, pepper, and aleppo pepper, stirring occasionally for 5-10 minutes or until it has started to take on some golden brown.
  3. Push the onion to the outside of the pan and add a bit more butter to the well in the center.  Add diced mushrooms with a pinch more salt.  Cook, stirring occasionally (after initial browning period, they can be stirred in with the onions), for 10-15 minutes or until they have taken on some golden brown.
  4. Deglaze the pan with some bourbon.
  5. Add diced or mashed sweet potato, sliced cabbage, pot roast, and chicken stock (about 1 cup) to the pan.  Stir together and let simmer while the pasta cooks.  Adjust the consistency as needed with more chicken stock and/or some of the salted cooking water from the pasta.  (This is a trick I learned from Lidia’s—the starch that cooks out of the pasta helps to thicken the sauce and the water helps to thin it out.  I know it sounds weird to go after both ends of the spectrum at once, but it really does work)
  6. I used radiatori pasta because the grooves in the pasta help to pick up the sauce and the flavor.  It would also go well with fusilli or a wide ribbon like papparadelle.

I Catch Up with the Mainstream

Monday, November 14th, 2016

Nine years ago, back before either of my kids had even been imagines, and I had all the time in the world; in a post most notable for its grammatically-correct use of five punctuation marks in a row, I had indicated that I saw very rare use for a garlic press.

I stuck by my guns for quite some time, and have gotten quite adept at peeling and mincing garlic, but I am coming around to where the mainstream has been for quite some time: it really does make things quicker and easier to crush garlic with a press than it does to peel and slice by hand.

One thing I have discovered, though, is that rather than crush the garlic directly into the frying pan, it makes a lot more sense to crush into a prep bowl.  That way, you have all the time you need to crush (in my case, at least) a dozen or two cloves of garlic for whatever you’re cooking, without the first garlic into the pan burning before the last clove is crushed.

When it comes to garlic presses, though, I am on the quest for the best press.  Mine is fine, it does the job; but I feel like there might be a better option out there.  The brief research I have done so far shows a huge range of prices, from less than $5 to just about $45.  I checked Cooks Illustrated, hoping for a budget-friendly option, but they recommend a $40 model.  This seems like a steep investment, and so I hold out hope that there is a less-expensive but highly-functioning option out there somewhere.

Lacking the budget to buy and test all of them, please leave a comment to let me know if you have any recommendations (for or against) a particular brand, source, or style.  I’ll aim to identify a few different options and give them a whirl to see how my current model stacks up against others’ favorites.

Mainstream Media Catches Up with Me

Saturday, November 12th, 2016

I got an email from my sister yesterday, letting me know that one of my earliest culinary creations had been picked up by the NY Times.

photo credit: Tony Cenicola/NY Times

photo credit: Tony Cenicola/NY Times

It was the peanut butter & pickle sandwich that my friend Brian and I invented when we were in, probably, first or second grade–with one big difference: whereas the NY Times recipe calls for bread & butter pickles, I would absolutely never use anything but a dill pickle on my PB&P.

Then, in this morning’s Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, there was a recipe for chili with kale.  The first time I put kale in my chili I was still in culinary school, overwhelmed by the sheer abundance of kale that we were getting from our CSA.  I figured, if kale is a braising green, why not braise it in chili?  The result was so good that the first question Aurora asked me the last time I told her I was planning on making a pot of chili was, “do we have kale?”  I’d say, follow the recipe from the P-G if you like, but better yet, just add kale into the pot for the last 30 minutes of cooking time on your favorite chili recipe and see how much you enjoy the results!

Greens with Mushrooms and Cranberries

Sunday, November 6th, 2016

My friend Janice asked me if I could post the recipe for this.  It is a tasty, autumnal dish.  The tartness of the cranberries plays the role that vinegar would usually take in a dish of greens, and the mushrooms add a layer of umami that helps bring the dish together. (check out these mushroom cooking tips)

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